Boston Sports Doc Injury Blog

Dr. Christopher Geary, your source for info on the latest sports injuries with a bit of a Boston slant…

Two starting quarterbacks, an NFL ironman and two important members of the Patriots’ suddenly-resurgent defense suffered injuries this weekend – here’s a quick look at their ailments and when they might return to their respective squads

 

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Carson Palmer being evaluated on the sideline for his left arm fracture (image courtesy of TheBigLead.com)

 

Cardinals’ QB Carson Palmer suffered an injury to his left (non-throwing) arm when he was sacked in the second quarter of Arizona’s eventual blowout loss at the hands of the Rams in London.  The Cardinals announced that Palmer had fractured “a bone” in his left arm and would need surgery.  From looking at the play and by making inferences from Palmer’s initial estimated return in 8 weeks from surgery, it’s safe to assume that he broke the ulna, one of the two long bones in his lower arm.

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Ulna (nightstick) fracture of the forearm (image courtesy of WikiRadiology)

This particular type of fracture is also known as a “nightstick” fracture, as it was once common for neer-do-wells and scofflaws to incur it while trying to protect themselves from a policeman’s nightstick – it almost always results from a direct blow to the forearm.  If the fracture is non-displaced (the fractured pieces of bone have not moved apart from each other) it can usually be treated non-operatively with a cast or brace for 6-8 weeks. If the fracture is displaced or if the patient is a high-demand athlete who possibly wants to return to play earlier than 6-8 weeks, surgery may be indicated.  Surgery involves an open incision and the placement of a plate and screws in the bone to re-align it and to ensure reliable healing.

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Example of a plate and screws fixing an ulna fracture (Image courtesy of ijoonline.com)

It was originally reported that Palmer would miss 8 weeks, but more recent reports have emerged that he would be seeking a second opinion and might return in as little as 4 weeks.  When he actually returns will largely be driven by his comfort level – it is potentially feasible that he could return in a month.  Even though the bone would not be fully healed at that point, the plate and screws could protect the healing ulna enough to allow for him to return with a still-healing fracture.  There is precedent for this in the recent NFL past – linebacker Jonathan Davis of the Panthers broke the same bone in the NFC Championship Game two years ago, had surgery almost immediately and played in the Super Bowl two weeks later.  Rob Gronkowski would serve as a cautionary tale for a fast return from this type of injury – he fractured his ulna blocking for an extra point (sigh…) in November of 2012, had surgery and returned later that season, but subsequently re-fractured the arm in the divisional round of the playoffs.  It seems safe to assume that Palmer will be back on the field this season, with the caveat that it will not be without some increased risk of re-injury.

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Jay Cutler down on the field after being sacked in the Dolphins game Sunday (image courtesy of Sun-Sentinel.com)

Jay Cutler was sacked in the Dolphins’ Sunday win over the Jets and didn’t return for the remainder of the game with what was initially announced as a chest injury – post-game x-rays and and MRI showed multiple “cracked” ribs.  This indicates that the QB broke multiple ribs, but the fractures are likely not at all displaced.  Not a whole lot to say about this injury except that it really, really, hurts.  Hurts to breathe, sneeze, cough, laugh… you get the idea.  Cutler’s return will be determined by when he can tolerate the rigors of being sacked by 300-plus pound defensive lineman, so it may be multiple weeks before the always-cheerful quarterback is back on the field.

Joe Thomas

Joe Thomas holds his injured left arm in Sunday’s game (Image courtesy of Akron Beacon Journal)

 

Earlier this season, Cleveland Browns left tackle Joe Thomas became the first player ever to play in 10,000 consecutive snaps, having played every offensive play of every game since being the third overall pick of the 2007 draft.  That remarkable streak came to an unfortunate end on Sunday when he injured his left arm on his 10,363rd straight snap.  While blocking the Titans’ Brian Orakpo he injured the arm and did not play another snap.  An MRI was performed and it was revealed that Thomas had fully torn his triceps tendon, an injury which will require surgery (the tendon is re-attached to the bone) and has ended his snaps streak and his season.  No amount of *cough* deer antler spray *cough* will allow him to return to full football activity sooner than 6-9 months, but he should make a full recovery for next season.  While it is not a terribly common injury, it is one with a good track record for reliable recovery.

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Patriots Linebacker Donta Hightower suffered a shoulder injury during the Sunday night game (Image courtesy of BostonGlobe.com)

As for the Patriots, defensive stalwarts Donta Hightower and Malcom Brown each suffered injuries in the second half of Sunday night’s game which caused them to miss the rest of the game.  It was announced that Hightower had a shoulder injury while Brown was out with an ankle injury.  While the exact nature of their injuries is not yet known (of course not, it’s the Patriots we’re talking about here), their participation in practice this week will certainly bear watching.  This is especially true in Hightower’s case, as he has a history of shoulder issues, most recently having right shoulder labrum repair after the Pats’ Super Bowl win over the Seahawks in 2015.

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